Change AGEnts: Building Momentum for Change, Improving Care of Older Adults

The 2015 John A Hartford Foundation Change AGEnts Conference, “Making Connections, Building Momentum for Change,” will be held on December 1 – 3, in Philadelphia.   Robert Schreiber, MD of Harvard, Hebrew Senior Life, and I will be facilitating a course on Leadership and Culture Change, as well as a session on Kotter’s Eight Step ProcessContinue reading “Change AGEnts: Building Momentum for Change, Improving Care of Older Adults”

CMS Regulations and Person-Centered Dementia Care: Are You Ready?

Change is coming. CMS has introduced multiple changes to nursing home regulations that will impact the industry, especially those facilities providing dementia care. Even though the comment period was extended, organizations need to take these potential changes seriously and begin to implement strategies and programs now. Doing so will not be quick or easy. ItContinue reading “CMS Regulations and Person-Centered Dementia Care: Are You Ready?”

Save Time and Money – Expertise Found at Annual AHCA/NCAL Convention

A CEO recently told me that he saved years of work and a great deal of money simply by attending a national conference. He wanted to develop a “best practice” memory care program and had decided that they would do so in-house with his own staff. After attending a conference and hearing expert presenters discussingContinue reading “Save Time and Money – Expertise Found at Annual AHCA/NCAL Convention”

Customer Service Transforms After A CEO’s Personal Experience

A recent article* about a hospital CEO elevates him to hero status, and his willingness to share his experience deserves attention. The point is he was willing to share a very personal experience about the customer service during his mother’s hospital stay, and how it transformed his own hospital. Upon spending time with his motherContinue reading “Customer Service Transforms After A CEO’s Personal Experience”

Respect, Staff Satisfaction/Turnover Back in the News

Despite decades of research and examination, millions of dollars are spent every year when staff members leave a healthcare facility. Turnover is rampant, found in all staff positions and at all levels in all departments. Why? Another new article and report indicates respect outweighs wages when examining staff satisfaction, this time in the home healthContinue reading “Respect, Staff Satisfaction/Turnover Back in the News”

Communication, Inclusion Benefit Staff Satisfaction and Turnover

Much has been written about common themes that are important to staff, as found in numerous staff satisfaction surveys. Most themes relate to being respected and heard, included in daily operations and decisions, and appreciated. All are such simple and basic requirements, and all can be addressed if administrators and managers create a culture byContinue reading “Communication, Inclusion Benefit Staff Satisfaction and Turnover”

Education and Training in Health Care: What Happens When the “Trainers” Leave?

A recent article discussed the importance and outcomes of training staff on dealing with dementia-related behavioral disturbances. Outcomes of a six-week training program for a select interdisciplinary group (trainees), but not all staff, saw a reduction in antipsychotic utilization. Results also indicated that those trained were more comfortable with non-aggressive behaviors, though some remained uncomfortableContinue reading “Education and Training in Health Care: What Happens When the “Trainers” Leave?”

Customer Service In Health Care – Will It Ever Change?

A recent article, “Is Your Team Hurting Your Occupancy?” discusses the importance of customer service and word of mouth – and that bad news travels fast. I could not agree more, as I believe customer service, i.e. the willingness to serve, is or should be foundational for health care – acute and post- acute. However,Continue reading “Customer Service In Health Care – Will It Ever Change?”

When a tragedy strikes in long-term care, who is to blame?

Sadly, we read of another tragic death, this time of a woman with memory loss in assisted living. The question will be asked; who is to blame? The staff member assigned to the resident, the staff on the shift, the charge nurse, the administrator, the owner, the corporation? Unfortunate events can and do happen toContinue reading “When a tragedy strikes in long-term care, who is to blame?”

High Staff Turnover? Give Them What They Want

Money alone is not the answer. Securing and retaining staff, keeping them happy and content continues to be a major and very expensive problem in assisted living and long-term care. Despite decades of research and examination, millions of dollars are spent every year when staff members leave a facility. Turnover plagues the industry, found inContinue reading “High Staff Turnover? Give Them What They Want”